Congratulation to Dr. Wolfgang

Today, the 5th of April 2012, is a memorable day for you. Congratulations Dr. Wolfgang Reinhardt for your successful defense of your thesis “Awareness – Supporting Knowledge Workers in Research Networks”.

I am happy that I have known you now for a couple of years. For your big day today I saved some pictures from a variety of events we shared together. Enjoy the show.

A virtual cheers from Milton Keynes.

Thomas

Co-citation analysis of the topic Social Network Analysis

Social Network Analysis as a research tool has already a long tradition and many articles have been published. For a recent collaboration with Rory Sie, Kamakshi Rajagopal, Karina Cela, Marlies Bitter-Rijpkema, Peter Sloep, and myself on Social Network Analysis in the area of technology-enhanced learning,  I prepared a co-citation analysis, which gives an overview of the topic and especially shows the multidisciplinary character of the field.

A literature search for social network analysis was conducted using Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge (February 2012). The topic search included the key terms “social network analysis”, “network analysis”  in combination with “technology-enhanced learning”, “TEL”, “e-learning”, “social science”, “educational science”, “psychology”, “computer science”, and “information science”. 133 papers matched the search query and were used in a co-citation analysis. A co-citation relation exists if two documents are cited together in an document. In total 5693 references were extracted. The graph was pruned by filtering all articles that had less than six citations in the 133 papers sample.

Co-citation analysis for Social Network Analysis
Co-citation analysis for Social Network Analysis

Inspecting the data reveals four broader categories were SNA is applied and researched. The categories are:

  • Scientometrics (the science of measuring and analysing science)
  • Network Theory (mathematical models, computational models)
  • Introduction Texts to SNA
  • Sociometrics/Sociology/Economics/Scientific practice

Our collaboration focuses especially on SNA for learning, however the body of knowledge is broader, which everyone researching SNA for TEL can benefit from.

References sorted by category:

Scientometrics: The science of measuring and analysing science

  • Ahlgren, Per, Bo Jarneving, and Ronald Rousseau. 2003. “Requirements for a Cocitation Similarity Measure, with Special Reference to Pearson’s Correlation Coefficient.” Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 54 (6) (April 1): 550–560.
  • Barabási, A.L, H Jeong, Z Néda, E Ravasz, A Schubert, and T Vicsek. 2002. “Evolution of the Social Network of Scientific Collaborations.” Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and Its Applications 311 (3–4) (August 15): 590–614.
  • Hirsch, J. E. 2005. “An Index to Quantify an Individual’s Scientific Research Output.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 102 (46) (November 15): 16569–16572.
  • Liu, X., J. Bollen, M.L. Nelson, and H. Van de Sompel. 2005. “Co-authorship Networks in the Digital Library Research Community.” Information Processing & Management 41 (6): 1462–1480.
  • McCain, Katherine W. 1990. “Mapping Authors in Intellectual Space: A Technical Overview.” Journal of the American Society for Information Science 41 (6) (September 1): 433–443.
  • Newman, M. E. J. 2001. “The Structure of Scientific Collaboration Networks.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 98 (2) (January 16): 404–409.
  • Newman, M. E. J. 2004. “Coauthorship Networks and Patterns of Scientific Collaboration.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 101 (suppl_1) (January 23): 5200–5205.
  • Otte, Evelien, and Ronald Rousseau. 2002. “Social Network Analysis: a Powerful Strategy, Also for the Information Sciences.” Journal of Information Science 28 (6) (December 1): 441–453.
  • Reeves, Byron, and Christine L Borgman. 1983. “A Bibliometric Evaluation of Core Journals in Communication Research.” Human Communication Research 10 (1) (September 1): 119–136.
  • Rice, Ronald E, Christine L Borgman, and Byron Reeves. 1988. “Citation Networks of Communication Journals, 1977–1985 Cliques and Positions, Citations Made and Citations Received.” Human Communication Research 15 (2) (December 1): 256–283.
  • So, C.Y. 1988. “Citation Patterns of Core Communication Journals: An Assessment of the Developmental Status of Communication.” Human Communication Research.
  • de Solla Price, D. J. 1965. “Networks of Scientific Papers.” Science 149 (3683) (July 30): 510–515.
  • White, H.D., and K.W. McCain. 1998. “Visualizing a Discipline: An Author Co-citation Analysis of Information Science, 1972-1995.” Journal of the American Society for Information Science 49 (4): 327–355.
  • White, Howard D. 2003. “Pathfinder Networks and Author Cocitation Analysis: A Remapping of Paradigmatic Information Scientists.” Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 54 (5) (March 1): 423–434.
  • White, Howard D, and Belver C Griffith. 1981. “Author Cocitation: A Literature Measure of Intellectual Structure.” Journal of the American Society for Information Science 32 (3) (May 1): 163–171.

Network Theory (mathematical models, computational models)

  • Albert, Réka, and Albert-László Barabási. 2002. “Statistical Mechanics of Complex Networks.” Reviews of Modern Physics 74 (1) (January 30): 47–97.
  • Barabási, Albert-László, and Réka Albert. 1999. “Emergence of Scaling in Random Networks.” Science 286 (5439) (October 15): 509–512.
  • Erdös, P, and A Rényi. 1959. “On Random Graphs, I.” Publicationes Mathematicae (Debrecen) 6: 290–297.
  • Freeman, L.C. 1979. “Centrality in Social Networks Conceptual Clarification.” Social Networks 1 (3): 215–239.
  • Girvan, M., and M. E. J Newman. 2002. “Community Structure in Social and Biological Networks.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 99 (12) (June 11): 7821–7826.
  • Linton C. Freeman. 1977. “A Set of Measures of Centrality Based on Betweenness.” Sociometry 40 (1) (March 1): 35–41.
  • Newman, M. E. J. 2003. “The Structure and Function of Complex Networks.” SIAM Review 45 (2) (June 1): 167–256.
  • Watts, Duncan J., and Steven H. Strogatz. 1998. “Collective Dynamics of ‘Small-world’ Networks.” Nature 393 (6684) (June 4): 440–442.

Introduction Texts to SNA

  • Hanneman, R.A., and M. Riddle. 2005. Introduction to Social Network Methods. University of California Riverside.
  • Scott, John. 2000. Social Network Analysis: a Handbook. SAGE.
  • Wasserman, Stanley, and Katherine Faust. 1994. Social Network Analysis: Methods and Applications. Cambridge University Press.
  • Nooy, Wouter de, Andrej Mrvar, and Vladimir Batagelj. 2011. Exploratory Social Network Analysis with Pajek. Cambridge University Press.
  • Borgatti, S.P., M.G. Everett, and L.C. Freeman. 2002. “Ucinet for Windows: Software for Social Network Analysis.” Harvard Analytic Technologies 2006.
  • Freeman, Linton C. 2004. The Development of Social Network Analysis. Booksurge.

Sociometrics/Sociology/Economics/Scientific practice

  • Granovetter, Mark S. 1973. “The Strength of Weak Ties.” American Journal of Sociology 78 (6) (May 1): 1360–1380.
  • Milgram, S. 1967. “The Small World Problem.” Psychology Today 2 (1): 60–67.
  • Burt, Ronald S. 1995. Structural Holes: The Social Structure of Competition. Harvard University Press.
  • Kuhn, Thomas S. 1996. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. University of Chicago Press.
  • Price, Derek J. de Solla. 1963. Little Science, Big Science. New York: Columbia University Press.

Call for papers 1st European Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in Learning Networks (ARNets11)

Call for papers and demos

1st European Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in Learning Networks (ARNets11)
to be held in conjunction with EC-TEL 2011, Palermo (Italy)

September 20 or 21, 2011

Web page: http://teleurope.eu/arnets11
Submissions: http://gkgo.me/arnets11
Twitter hashtag: #arnets11

The workshop aims to build an interdisciplinary understanding of issues regarding awareness and reflection in networked learning. It will attract participants from social science, computer science, design, psychology, and learning sciences to challenge the understanding of the fields of awareness and reflection in Technology Enhanced Learning. The participants will present and discuss their papers and work together on an integrated roadmap for future research in this field.

Background
In today’s economy, knowledge is one of the most important resources for both individuals and organizations. People invest significant efforts in the design and development of learning resources and software that strives to enhance the learning successes of individuals and groups. Networking, exchanging ideas and using tools for research on the Web are essential parts of their learning practice. While learners are, to a certain degree, aware about their relations in these networks and the partners of their communication, technology can make explicit related activities beyond the individual focus of attention. Additionally, technology can help learners bring knowledge and knowledge needs from their individual learning space into networked environments. It is important to note that not all activities relevant for learning already happen in online networks. Rather, motivated individuals engage in these networks, but there are lots more learners who could profit from such an engagement, but just never take the necessary steps. Here, technology can help e.g. by raising awareness about learner’s activities or those of others, related communities, information needs, etc.

Computer-mediated communication has the advantage that it can create mirroring artefacts, which capture learning analytic data to help learners to become aware and to reflect. These can be (1) via mirroring information, which would normally be visible in face-to-face situations, but which can be viewed as a highlight or learning-focused selection, and (2) mirroring information, which is normally invisible in face-to-face situations, but that has the potential to improve the working or learning process. This information could help learners to become aware of their constantly changing connections and interactions beyond their individual context and help them to reflect upon.

Please visit the workshop website to find more information on the workshop’s background and motivation: http://teleurope.eu/arnets11

Topics of interest
The ARNets workshop focuses on current research trends and challenges in the field of awareness and reflection in the domain of learning networks / networked learning.  The topics include, but are not limited to:

# Awareness and reflection in learning networks
# Awareness and reflection for lifelong learning.
# Different views on awareness and reflection, depending on discipline, and goal
# Awareness of and reflection about social context, knowledge, artefacts and processes
# Awareness and reflection in organizational learning
# Semantic Web and awareness
# Orchestration of awareness and reflection
# Awareness and reflection in online learning / research environments
# Activation of reflection processes
# Awareness of pivotal events and their reflection support
# Awareness and reflection tools
# Pedagogical/didactic arrangements
# Awareness and reflection analytics
# Challenges in researching awareness and reflection
# Awareness and group formation, peer-support
# Future scenarios

Authors are invited to submit original unpublished work. Demonstrations are encouraged:
# Full papers: (12-16 pages) that describe problems, needs, novel approaches and frameworks within the scope of the workshop. Empirical evaluation papers and industrial experience reports are welcome for submission.
# Short papers (6-10 pages) that state the position of the authors within the scope of the workshop and describe solution concepts and work in progress.
# Posters and demo papers (1-2 pages) that summarize preliminary work results

Please submit your proposal via the ginkgo event management system at http://gkgo.me/arnets11

All submitted contributions will be peer-reviewed by at least two members of the program committee for originality, significance and quality. The papers will be published in the CEUR-WS.org (http://ceur-ws.org) workshops proceedings (a publication series with ISSN). Furthermore selected papers will be part of a Special Issue in a well-known international Journal (currently in negotiations). Submissions should use the Springer LCNS template (http://www.springer.com/computer/lncs?SGWID=0-164-6-793341-0). We encourage you to produce your submission using LaTeX as typesetting tool and the respective LaTeX template.

Important dates
Deadline for papers: 11 July 2011
Notification of acceptance: 10 August 2011
Deadline camera-ready: 01 September 2011
Dates of the workshop: 20 or 21 September 2011
Dates of the conference: 20-23 September 2011

Organizers
Wolfgang Reinhardt, University of Paderborn (Germany), @wollepb
Thomas D. Ullmann, The Open University (UK), @thomasullmann
Peter Scott, The Open University (UK), @peter_scott
Viktoria Pammer, Know Center (Austria), @contextgroupkc
Owen Conlan, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland), @oconlan
Adriana Berlanga, Open University of the Netherlands (Netherlands) @adrianaberlanga

My top five Web 2.0 tools for Research

During the summer school on Technology-Enhanced Learning Peter Kraker, who led the session on “Using Web 2.0 in your PhD”, asked the question, what are your five Web 2.0 tools you are using for your research?

Here are mine:

  1. Google Scholar: Mostly I use it in combination with the Publish or Perish tool, which ranks the results as a hint of highly cited papers (although I am not a big fan of such metrics, but it helps). Sometimes I cross check with Microsoft Academic Search, which has additional information about authors, timelines, co-author graphs, etc.
  2. To manage my bibliographic references I mostly use Zotero, a firefox plugin, which let me easily add metadata from publications to my repository as well as it shows me analytics of my publication store. It also does a good job in converting the publications in all forms of citations styles. It has also the facilities of sharing resources with other to build publication social networks. But the ladder one is less explored by myself.
  3. Google docs and Etherpad for collaborative writing in combination with video conferencing tools like Skype or Flashmeeting.
  4. Social Networking tools: I mostly use TELeurope, a social networking platform for people interested in Technology-Enhanced Learning. First I was thinking about using facebook or linkedin but discovered limitations regarding community building in the TEL area. TELeurope is thematically oriented on Technology-Enhanced Learning and provides for this purpose more tailored tools than the mentioned social networking platforms. This includes not only the group tools but also facilities of blogs, wiki-like pages, the liking of activities, podcast infrastructure, embedding of external widgets/gadgets, publication infrastructure, status updates (which can automatically be send to Twitter), to follow the activity of other people, a personalized dashboard and profile page, and some more.
    Another benefit is to have an aggregated view on all activities in the TEL area coming from all activities. This means that an activity can be visible by all TELeurope members (currently over 1000 real users), and not only by the group of the mentioned other social networking platforms.
    TELeurope is also set up in a way that updates are automatically shown in other services. This includes for example a TELeurope status update to Twitter features and TELeurope blog and wiki posts to a Facebook page.
    And more from a technical perspective. TELeurope uses the open source platform Elgg and therefore allows to engineer the platform for all upcoming needs of the community, compared to proprietary systems. And the developments made at TELeurope are made available to the open source community.
  5. For publishing Workshop proceedings I use by now ceur-ws.org. Your proceedings are quickly online and are freely accessible. You can find an example of our Workshop about Research 2.0 at the EC-TEL 2010 conference here: CEUR-WS.org/Vol-675

You can also participate. Write down your five tools and tweet the link with the hashtag #jtelss11.

Call for papers Awareness and Reflection in Personal Learning Environments (#ARPLE11)

Awareness and Reflection in Personal Learning Environments (#ARPLE11)
Workshop at the PLE conference 2011
Date 11th of July 2011
Venue: University of Southampton, UK
Website: http://teleurope.eu/arple11
Submission deadline: 29.06.2011/04.07.2011

Background and Motivation
The workshop is intended to discuss and build an interdisciplinary understanding for the role of awareness and reflection in Personal Learning Environments. While different researchers have stressed the importance of awareness and reflection support in PLEs there is no agreed set of such functionalities in existence yet. Also we lack a structured overview of awareness and reflections issues that learners are facing in their daily learning activities. As both researchers and developers interested in the PLE domain seem to be in need of such information in order to best tailor their R&D activities, this workshop aims at collecting requirements and open issues in the domain.

The workshop aims to attract participants from educational science, psychology, social science, computer science, and design to challenge the understanding of the research fields of awareness and reflection in Personal Learning Environments. We also aim to attract developers from academia and economy that implement personalizable learning environments.

Goal of the workshop
The concept of the workshop is target to collaboratively develop an integrated roadmap for future research and development in the domain. Therefore we designed the workshop as a highly interactive session. Starting with a short introduction of the work of the participants and their statements about the future challenges of their research we will work towards a roadmap of research in awareness and reflection with focus on Personal Learning Environments. For more information please visit the workshop website at TELeurope.

Submission and Participation
The following types of submissions are possible:
# Position paper
# Discussion paper
# Participation statement

Position paper:
A short position paper situating your research (1-2 pages) in the workshop. The following questions can guide your position paper:
What are you researching?
What are the challenges of your research?
What should we, as the participants of this workshop, focus on?
What should be on the research agenda of the next five years?

Discussion paper:
The discussion papers can for example elaborate existing issues with awareness and reflection in PLEs, sketch ideas for supporting functionalities or discuss the results of ongoing research in the domain (5-10 pages).

Participation statement:
Please write an email to the organizers, to let us know that you are coming.

Your submission will help us to structure the hands-on activities and discussions for the workshop.

Topics
1. Requirements on awareness and reflection support in PLEs
2. Awareness and reflection widgets (implementations, visions)
3. Awareness and reflection Mash-Ups
4. Awareness and reflection scenarios for formal or informal learning
5. Awareness and reflection support for researchers
6. Theory on awareness and reflection
7. Methods researching awareness and reflection

Find more information about the format of the workshop:
http://teleurope.eu/arple11

Important dates
Submission deadline discussion paper: 29.06.2011
Notification of acceptance discussion paper: 04.07.2011
Camera-ready version: 22.07.2011 (after the workshop)
Submission deadline position paper: 04.07.2011
Notification of acceptance of the position paper within two days.
Deadline participation statement: 06.07.2011

Submission
Submit to t.ullmann@open.ac.uk and wolle@upb.de. You will receive a confirmation within one day.

Submissions should use the Springer LCNS template (http://www.springer.com/computer/lncs?SGWID=0-164-6-793341-0). We encourage you to produce your submission using LaTeX as typesetting tool and the respective LaTeX template.

Organizers
Wolfgang Reinhardt (University of Paderborn, Germany, @wollepb)
Thomas Daniel Ullmann (Open University of the UK, @thomasullmann)

Mash-Up Personal Learning Environments Lecture Series – Trailer

The trailer for the MUP/PLE Lecture Series in online. During the Summer 2011 the Knowledge Media Institute of the Open University is running a lecture series with experts from all other Europe. The easiest way to stay updated about forthcoming events is to join the MUPPLE group on TELeurope: http://www.teleurope.eu/pg/groups/681/mupple/

And here is the trailer: